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Milwaukee 49-22-4085 17 Piece Deluxe Electricians' Hole Saw Kit Since its founding in 1924, Milwaukee has focused on a single vision: to produce the best heavy-duty electric power tools and accessories available to professional user. Today, the Milwaukee name stands for the highest quality, durable and reliable professional tools money can buy. This deluxe 17 piece Electricians' Hole Saw Kit has the ultimate range of diameters available. The 12 diameters include: 5/8 inch, 3/4 inch, 7/8 inch, 1 inch, 1-1/8 inch, 1-1/4 inch, 1-3/8 inch, 1-1/2 inch, 1-3/4 inch, 2 inch, 2-1/2 inch, and 3 inch. The kit also includes arbor 49-56-7000 for hole saws up to 1-3/16 inch and arbor 49-56-7140 for hole saws 1-1/4 inch and larger. Additionally the kit has three pilot bits 49-56-8000 and an impact resistant plastic carrying case. The case is also sold separately as 48-55-0784. The hole saws in this kit are of the 6 teeth per inch design. Milwaukee 49-22-4085 17 Piece Deluxe Electricians' Hole Saw Kit Features: • Deluxe assortment of 12 hole saws, two arbors, and three pilot bits • Hole Saws: 5/8 in., 3/4 in., 7/8 in., 1 in., 1-1/8 in., 1-1/4 in., 1-3/8 in., 1-1/2 in., 1-3/4 in., 2 in., 2-1/2 in., 3 in.




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This article originally appeared in Cabling Business Magazine--

NEC Exam Practice Questions-2


By David Herres


National Electrical Code practice exam questions and answers (2)--

Most of us cannot memorize all National Electrical Code provisions but fortunately state electrician licensing examinations are invariably open book. Similarly, in the field or at the drawing board it is feasible to keep a copy of the Code handy and refer to it as needed.

It is not important to know all the requirements, but rather how to find them quickly. Some categories of information are all in one place, whereas others, such as receptacle requirements, are spread throughout the Code.

To succeed in passing exams and also to work efficiently at the profession, it is useful to know the Table of Contents and the Index above all.

Low voltage cabling is covered extensive in the National Electrical Code, especially in the later chapters. Code violations, besides being dangerous to future building inhabitants, can necessitate expense rework. Time spent studying the Code is an excellent investment.

The following Code questions are approximately the same level of difficulty as found in many state electricians’ licensing exams –

1. On switchboard and control panels over 600 volts exceeding _______ feet in width, there is to be one entrance at each end of the equipment

A) 4

B) 5

C) 6

D) 8

Answer: C) 6

A single entrance is permitted if there is continuous and unobstructed way of exit travel or if the depth of working space is twice what is otherwise required.

2. For over 600 volts where there is a personnel door(s) intended as entrance to and egress from the working space less than _______ feet from the nearest edge of the working space, the doors must open in the direction of egress and be equipped with panic bars, pressure plates, or other devices that are normally latched but open under simple pressure.

A) 15

B) 20

C) 25

D) 30

Answer: C) 25

A person whose hands have been burned by arc flash may not be able to operate a doorknob.

3. For over 600 volts, permanent ________ must be provided to give safe access to the working space around electrical equipment installed on platforms, balconies or mezzanine floors or in attic or roof rooms or spaces.

A) ladders

B) stairways

C) ladders or stairways

D) none of the above

Answer: C) ladders or stairways

Such equipment is considered accessible, not readily accessible, if a ladder that is not in place is required to reach it.

4. The continuity of a grounded conductor may not depend on a connection to a metallic enclosure, raceway or cable armor.

A) True.

B) False.

Answer: A) True.

A grounded conductor may have voltage on it and would present a shock hazard if the above conditions were permitted.

5. An insulated grounded conductor of _________ AWG or smaller must be identified by a continuous white or gray outer finish or by three continuous white stripes on other than green insulation along its entire length.

A) 10

B) 8

C) 6

D) 4

Answer: C) 6

Four exceptions allow different identification means for specified types of wire.

6. An insulated grounded conductor larger than 6 AWG shall be identified by ______

A) a continuous white or gray outer finish.

B) three continuous white stripes along its entire length on other than green insulation.

C) at the time of installation, by a distinctive white or gray marking at its terminations. This marking shall encircle the conductor or insulation.

D) Any of the above.

Answer: D) Any of the above.

For larger than 6 AWG, it is customary to stock black only and mark at terminations. Phase tape, which is like electrical tape but comes in various colors, is excellent for this purpose.

7. Grounded conductors of different systems that are installed in the same raceway, cable, box, auxiliary gutter or other type of enclosure may all be white.

A) True.

B) False

Answer: B) False. vGrounded conductors of different systems in the same raceway, cable, box, auxiliary gutter or other type of enclosure have to be distinguishable.

8. All devices provided with terminals for the attachment of conductors shall have terminals properly marked for connection except

A) panelboards.

B) devices over 30 amperes.

C) where clearly evident.

D) All of the above.

Answer: D) All of the above.

In the case of a panelboard, it is obvious that the grounded conductors go to the ground bar and the ungrounded conductors go the breaker outputs.

9. Receptacles, polarized attachment plugs and cord connectors for plugs and polarized plugs must have the terminal intended for connection to the grounded conductor identified as follows:

A) Identification shall be by a metal or metal coating that is substantially white in color or by the word white or by the letter W located adjacent to the identified terminal. vB) If the terminal is not visible, the conductor entrance hole for the connection shall be colored white or marked with the word white or the letter W.

C) Both A and B.

D )Neither A nor B.

Answer: C) Both A and B.

Correct polarity is critical since a wiring error could result in user electrocution.

10. For devices with screw shells, the terminal for the grounded conductor shall be the one connected to the screw shell.

A) True.

B) False.

Answer: A) True.

This arrangement lessens the chance of shock while relamping.

11. No grounded conductor shall be attached to any terminal or lead so as to reverse the designated polarity.

A) True.

B) False.

Answer: A) True.

This summarizes many requirements found in Article 200.

12. Other than individual branch circuits are rated:

A) 15, 20 and 30 amperes.

B) 15, 20, 30 and 40 amperes.

C) 15, 20, 30, 40 and 50 amperes.

D) 15, 20, 30, 50 and 60 amperes.

Answer: C) 15, 20, 30, 40 and 50 amperes.

Conductors of higher ratings may be used for a variety of reasons, but the circuit rating is always based on the rating of the overcurrent device.

13. Multi-wire branch circuits

A) Must have all conductors originate from the same panelboard or distribution equipment.

B) Shall be provided with a means that will simultaneously disconnect all ungrounded conductors at the point where the branch circuit originates.

C) Shall supply only line-to-neutral loads.

D) All of the above.

Answer: D) All of the above.

Some electricians use multi-wire branch circuits extensively due to undeniable economy of materials and efficiency. Others are against them primarily because errors in future rewiring can cause hazardous overheating of the neutral.

14. In dwelling units and guest rooms or suites of hotels, motels and similar occupancies, the voltage shall not exceed 120 volts nominal between conductors that supply terminals of:

A) luminaires.

B) cord-and-plug connected loads 1440 volt-amperes or less.

C) loads less than a specified horsepower.

D) Any of the above.

Answer: D) Any of the above.

Use of 240 volt is less restricted in non-dwelling occupancies.

15. Ground-fault circuit-interrupter protection for personnel for all 125-volt, single-phase, 15- and 20-ampere receptacles is required in dwelling units for

A) all bathrooms.

B) bathrooms within 36 inches of a sink.

C) throughout the kitchen.

D) throughout the kitchen except the refrigerator.

Answer: A) all bathrooms.

GFCI use over the years has greatly expanded and as a direct result fatalities from electrocution have declined markedly.

16. Ground-fault circuit-interrupter protection for personnel for all 125-volt, single-phase, 15- and 20-ampere receptacles is required in dwelling units for

A) all garages.

B) garages at or below grade.

C) garages where vehicles are washed.

D) garages where vehicles may be serviced.

Answer: A) all garages.

If you are in contact with dry concrete, you are grounded.

17. Ground-fault circuit-interrupter protection for personnel for all 125-volt, single-phase, 15- and 20 ampere receptacles in crawl spaces is required.

A) True.

B) False.

Answer: A) True.

These areas possess high ground potential.

18. In dwelling units ground-fault circuit-interrupter protection for personnel for all 125-volt, single-phase, 15- and 20- ampere receptacles in kitchens is required.

A) True.

B) False.

Answer: B) False.

GFCI protection is required only for receptacles serving countertop surfaces.

19. In dwelling units ground-fault circuit-interrupter protection for personnel for all 125-volt, single-phase, 15- and 20- ampere receptacles in unfinished basements is required

A) True.

B) False.

Answer: B) False.

An exception exempts permanently installed fire alarm and burglar alarm systems.

20. In dwelling units ground-fault circuit-interrupter protection for personnel for all 125-volt, single-phase, 15- and 20-ampere receptacles in laundry, utility and wetbar sinks where the receptacles are installed within _______ feet of the outside edge of the sink is required.

A) 2

B) 4

C) 6

D) 8

Answer: C) 6

This is a minimum requirement. GFCI's may be used throughout a laundry room.

21. Boathouses require GFCI protection throughout.

A) True.

B) False.

Answer: A) True.

Anywhere there is water, GFCIs are a safety featureâ especially around salt water, which is more conductive.

22. In dwelling units ground-fault circuit-interrupter protection for personnel is required for all 125-volt, single-phase, 15- and 20-ampere receptacles in outdoor locations.

A) True.

B) False.

Answer: B) False.

Receptacles that are not readily accessible and are supplied by a dedicated circuit for electric snow-melting or de-icing equipment are exempt.

23. In other than dwelling units ground-fault circuit-interrupter protection for personnel for all 125-volt, single-phase, 15- and 20-ampere receptacles is required in the following locations:

A) Bathrooms, kitchens, rooftops, outdoors and sinks.

B) Bathrooms, kitchens, garages, outdoors and sinks.

C) Bathrooms, kitchens, garages and rooftops.

D Bathrooms, kitchens, garages and sinks.

Answer: A) Bathrooms, kitchens, rooftops, outdoors and sinks.

Notice that in non-dwellings all kitchen receptacles require GFCI protection whereas in dwellings only receptacles serving countertop areas require this protection.

24. GFCI protection is required for boat hoist outlets in dwelling unit locations

A) If the voltage does not exceed 120.

B) If the voltage does not exceed 240.

C) If the motor is not double-insulated.

D) If the motor does not have an in-sight lockout.

Answer: B) If the voltage does not exceed 240.

Most GFCI protection is limited to 120 volts, but for boat hoist outlets, 240 volt outlets are included.

25. Twenty-ampere branch circuits are required in dwelling unit as follows:

A) Two in kitchen, one in laundry, two in bathroom.

B) Two in kitchen, one in laundry, one in bathroom.

C) Two in kitchen, one in laundry, two in bathroom.

D) Two in kitchen, two in laundry, two in bathroom.

Answer: B) Two in kitchen, one in laundry, one in bathroom.

The two in kitchen generally serve the countertop and are GFCI protected. The refrigerator can be 15-amp and is not required to be GFCI protected.

-- END --

Next:More NEC practice questions and answers.

Books for electricians --

Here is a selection of the most significant electricians' books available online today, at the best prices around. Clicking on any logo provides access to reviews and ratings by electricians. A good place to start is with the 2008 NEC Handbook, which contains the complete text of the current code plus extensive commentary, diagrams and illustrations. Other books of interest for the electrician are available as well.

Low Voltage, Telecom, Fire Alarm Books --


This site is created and conducted By David Herres, NH Master Electrician License #11335M

E-mail: electriciansparadise@hughes.net


HOME | Best Web Host | Question of the Week | Archived Questions | More Archived NEC Questions | Still More Archived Questions | Still More Archived Questions-2 | Still More Archived Questions-3 | Articles | Electrical Deficiencies | More Electrical Deficiencies | Electricians Tools | Online computers | Cybercorner | Electrician's License | Electronics Tutorials | Electricians' worksaving ideas | Electronic Theorems | Satellite Dish | Digital Cameras and Equipment | HTML Color Chart | Electronic Acronyms | Electronic Definitions | Electrician's Soldering Tutorial | Photovoltaic Power | Wind Power | Fire Alarm Basics | More Fire Alarm Info | Working with MC and EMT | Electricians' Color Code | Wiring Commercial Garages | Managing Your Emergency Lights | Lighting Design | Industrial Wiring | Wiring Ethernet | Residential Wiring | Low Voltage Wiring | PLC Overview | Electrical Troubleshooting Techniques | Using Loop Impedance Meter | Ten Common Grounding Errors |NEC and Low-Voltage Wiring | Raceway Protection and NEC | Working with Metal Raceway | Inductance and Characteristic Impedance | Understanding Capacitance | History of the Ethernet | Twisting Data Conductors | NEC Article 800, Communications Circuits | NEC Article 810, Radio and Television Equipment | NEC Article 820, Community Antenna and Radio Distribution Equipment | NEC Article 830, Network-Powered Broadband | Troubleshooting Submersible Well Pumps | Wiring Healthcare Facilities | First Edition National Electrical Code 1897 | Books for Electricians | Links


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